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With Egoscue, Sequencing Is Important!

Whether you’re doing your Egoscue Method menu, following a cake recipe, or putting together a desk from IKEA, order is important. (Actually, to have any hope of getting an IKEA desk together properly, following the right order is extremely important. But I digress… )

With The Egoscue Method, it’s not only essential to start with the proper exercise and follow the order of your menu, it’s also important to start with the proper joint or area of your body.

For example, if you’re struggling with knee pain but look in the mirror and notice your upper body is rotated, then that’s the first order of business. I guarantee that your upper body is compensating because of your knee pain. Your thoracic rotation is your body’s way of helping you move. It is doing work that your lower body can’t functionally do.

If you skip over that fact and simply try to get the knee functioning properly, you’re putting the cart before the horse. Again, order is important. You wouldn’t be doing you or your knee any favors by allowing you to stay rotated throughout the therapy process.

Which area of the body you attack first plays directly into the sequencing of the E-cises in your menu. Starting with an exercise like Static Back, for example, would allow your upper body to settle in and un-rotate. The better your upper body is functioning, the better the lower body will function.

Think of it like peeling the layers of an onion. Your knee pain is the center of the onion. Your upper-body rotation is the outer layer of the onion. Sure, you can cut through the onion and fix the center, but you’ve done nothing to address the outer layers that are impacting your overall function. The more you peel away the superficial layers, the closer you get to the core of the issue.

With your menu, if you decide to cherry-pick, doing only the exercises you like or that “feel good”, you’re doing things out of order. You might be strengthening before straightening. You might be walking before you crawl. You might be putting the cart before the horse.

Not only does one exercise set up the next, but addressing one part of the body also sets up the next. Take the exercises and your menus in order, no matter how much you love or hate them. There’s a method to our madness—or better yet, a madness to this Method.